Culture Cravings | Matcha Gin Fizz

September 15, 2019

 

So I've been spending weeks creating cocktails for my bar. This sounds great, but it's rough work drinking gin all day. Honestly, it is. If anyone is willing to be a taste tester for me, please let me know.

 

Anyway, since my bar is also a teahouse, I've been playing around with tea inspired cocktails. My absolute favorite has been my Matcha Gin Fizz (a.k.a. The Imperialist). It's bright enough for a summer's day, but earthy enough for a winter's night. It is wonderfully smooth and beautifully balanced. I can't get enough of it. 

 

 

The only way to achieve the velvet texture I was seeking for my Matcha Gin Fizz, was to use an egg white. Egg whites are basically odorless and tasteless, so they're a perfect addition to hundreds of recipes. The concept is similar to a meringue; If you add citrus juice and some sort of sugar syrup to an egg white and agitate the mixture, you create a luxurious foam. The overall texture and appearance of the cocktail ends up being similar to that of a latte.

 

I know that the idea of an egg in one's drink may be hard to swallow, so if you're worried about salmonella poisoning, just make sure you use fresh eggs when you're mixing cocktails. 

 

 

Matcha Gin Fizz (a.k.a. The Imperialist)

2 oz London Dry Gin

3/4 oz Fresh Lemon Juice

3/4 oz Simple Syrup**

1 tsp Matcha (I use Ceremonial Grade Encha)

1 Egg White

 

Combine all ingredients into a cocktail shaker and dry* shake for 30 seconds, or until the egg white and matcha are fully incorporated.

 

*Dry simply means without ice. Boston shakers work best. Cobbler shakers tend to not seal properly and often leak. (I know this because I once had a Cobbler shaker shoot egg white all over my kitchen. You live and learn, kids.)

 

 

Add ice and shake vigorously again for 30 more seconds.

 

Using a Hawthorne strainer, strain into a chilled coupe glass. If you don't have a strainer, use a fine mesh sieve. 

 

Garnish to your liking.

 

Serve.

 

If you want a thicker foam on your cocktail, try the Reverse Dry Shake method:

 

Shake all of the ingredients with ice for 30 seconds. Then remove the ice and dry shake the ingredients for 30 more seconds. Pour everything straight into a chilled coupe glass. No need to strain again.

 

Some bartenders worry about the drink getting too warm, but the dry shake is taking place in a chilled shaker, so it should never be a problem.

**If you want to make your own simple syrup, use a 1:1 ratio of water to sugar and heat until the sugar is dissolved. Let cool and store in an airtight container for up to a month. Done.

 

If you have any cocktail recipes you'd like to share, please please please do so in the comments below. I want to try all of your creative concoctions.

 

x

 


 

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